Get your Animal Chiropractic Practice UP & RUNNING today!!!

(The Complete Package!)

 

Package Includes: 

AC 101    $13,245.95

Extra Bale    $300.00

Horse Neck    $400.00

Social Media for 1 year (FB and Instagram)   $1,800.00

Website Design and Hosting for 1 year   $5,200.00

Cavanti 100 level/ month and 200 slush   $1,250.00

12 nights lodging at the Ranch    $2028.00

200 Bringing Out Best Books       $700.00

Dr. Rounds for 1 year   $ 240.00

Horse Spine   $1,750.00

10 White Board Videos customized    $1,490.00

Animal Chiropractic Desk Statues     $150.00

TOTAL VALUE  $28,553.95

 

Animal Chiropractic 101 is the premier entry course to Animal Chiropractic.  

 

AC 101 meets the requirements for AVCA certification, Colorado DC licensing, Minnesota, and Oklahoma licensing. A.C.E.S. graduates continually have the highest scores on the AVCA certification exam.  Basic education at A.C.E.S. includes the completion of 129 hours of online presentations and only 3 trips to the Ranch in Meridian for 111 hours of hands-on laboratories.  The student may choose the speed with which he or she completes each section.  A.C.E.S. labs include supervised animal adjusting, not just set-ups.  Evening discussions on marketing and practice building help our graduates go home after the first module and begin to implement Animal Chiropractic into their practice.  If you are comparing this program to others make sure you are comparing Apples to Apples.  

 

Students’ access to this equipment is included in the cost of the course: 

Downloadable notes for on-line portion

Access to online lectures for 2 years from the time of enrollment

Bound notes for laboratory sessions

Adjusting bale that is used for both canine and equine adjusting.  Available to take home at course completion.

Canine Spine that helps the doctor learn Animal Chiropractic and show their clients the benefits of Animal Chiropractic.  

Available after laboratory 1.

Speeder Board used to practice the thrust and stabilization needed for proper adjusting technique.  

Available after laboratory 1.

Marketing materials

Access to Doctors Rounds and private student Facebook pages.

Animal Chiropractic 101 is only open to licensed veterinarians or chiropractors, and to individuals who are currently students of a veterinary or chiropractic college and are within 2 years of obtaining a license in one of these professions. 

 

Laboratories will have a student/teacher ratio no greater than 5:1. Laboratory instructors must be AVCA certified doctors with a minimum of 2 years practice and an animal population comparable to those which they are teaching. Location of the laboratory and live classroom lectures will be in Meridian, Texas. You can view laboratory dates on our Google calendar.  Lab 1 meets the first week of each month, while Labs 2 and 3 meet every other month during the week following Lab 1. Labs begin on Thursday at 1 p.m. and finish at 5 p.m. on Sunday.  Come to the labs at your convenience. Finish as quickly as 2 months or as long as 2 years.

Registrants will provide copies of license or a transcript from the school of their doctoral degree, and a picture ID photo.

 

Animal Chiropractic 101 Certificate: Allows sitting for AVCA exam, Fulfills Minnesota, Oklahoma and Colorado Animal Chiropractic laws.

Duration: 240 hours

Assessments: Yes

Skill Level: Chiropractor, Veterinarian, Chiropractic Student, Veterinary Student

Lectures: 90

Quizzes: 90

Language: English

Jedi Master Package

$28,553.95 Regular Price
$19,995.95Sale Price
  • Animal Chiropractic Module 101, 102, and 103 Course Descriptions

    Rev. 2019 October

    Pre-requisites: Eligible students are already a licensed veterinarian or chiropractor, OR are a current student of a professional veterinary or chiropractic college and will be licensed sometime in the next 2 years.

    Credits: 240 hours total

    Locations: 129 online lecture hours. 111 On-site laboratory hours held in Meridian, Texas

    Courses are distributed throughout the modules as described in the syllabus. Courses must be taken in order, with passing scores in each course before the student may continue. Students have a window of 2 years from the date of registration to complete the entire curriculum.  We understand that Life happens and so an extension is available for an extra fee.

    Schedule: Lecture courses are on-going and available at the student’s leisure. Each laboratory module is available numerous times a year. Forty hours of online lecture material must be completed prior to attending each laboratory. Students may attend labs at any time when they are offered; but must attend them in order.  Laboratory 1 is offered 12 times a year.  Laboratory 2 and 3 are available 6 times a year.  Check the calendar for exact dates.  

    Exams: Open book quizzes are presented at the completion of each lecture. A passing score of 90% is needed to proceed to the next lecture.  A closed book Scantron exam is given on the Friday of each laboratory module.  Practical Technique exams are given on Sunday of each module including both short answer and practical stations.  Practical exams must be completed with a passing score of 75%.  The combined score of the Scantron and quizzes must average 75%.  Should it be necessary Scantron exams may be repeated at the end of the module after extra help from instructors with a fee of $25 per repeated exam.

    Extra credit and make up exams: Do Not Exist as students must pass each course before proceeding to the next level.

    Proper Attire: When attending laboratory weekends, appropriate attire is expected.  The animals being worked on in class will belong to someone.  Please respect them for coming in.  Closed toed shoes are required for all equine labs.

    Audio/Video Recording: Recording devices are not allowed during laboratory sessions. The court has ruled that a professor’s voice and physical image are his or her own personal property, and thus recording the information is expressly prohibited.

    Course Objectives:

    1) Students will be presented with some of the most in-depth animal anatomic terminology which they should be able to use when conversing with other health care professionals and should understand so that they can convey the information to their clients.

    2)Students will be able to use the knowledge they acquire regarding anatomy to provide a chiropractic assessment.

    3)The potential dangers of working with animals will be discussed with the students and they in turn will be able to demonstrate their knowledge through avoidance of injury when working with animals.

    4)Listed below are the individual lectures and coursework presented to students throughout this program. Students will be able to demonstrate their mastery of these skills and this knowledge upon completion of this course.

    5)Students will be presented with practice management information that they will be able to utilize and demonstrate during this course.

    Chiropractic and Veterinary Specific Courses

    Introduction to Veterinary Lingo encompass the terminology of veterinary medicine that applies to chiropractic work with animals. The terminology is introductory for chiropractic doctors and includes anatomical terminology, breed and species information, and vital sign information. Also included are vertebral formulas for the common species discussed. The goal of this course is to help the student feel at ease with new terminology outside of his or her usual practice setting.

     

    Introduction to Chiropractic Lingo for Veterinarians is a course in which licensed veterinarians are introduced to terminology in chiropractic medicine that is important for providing chiropractic care to animals. This course will introduce subjects such as Line of Correction (LOC), pisiform, thenar, and other information important for understanding many of the techniques and treatment modalities in chiropractic as it applies to animals. The goal of this course is to help the student feel at ease with new terminology outside of his or her usual practice setting.

     

    Introduction to Chiropractic Lingo part 1 by Dr. Bill Ormston is a lecture introducing the nuances of chiropractic to doctors who are not familiar with these terms, particularly for our veterinary doctors. In this lecture Dr. Ormston focuses on emphasizing the need to be able to speak the language effectively in order to communicate with other doctors. Topics covered include the underlying philosophy that pervades chiropractic lingo used in discussion of patients, definitions for subluxation complex, the innate, the core principles of chiropractic, myopathology, histopathology, pathophysiology, motion palpation, listings, and neuropathophysiology and kinesiopahtophysiology. The student will complete this course understanding the clearly different mindset and perspective of chiropractic from that of traditional medicine.

     

    Vertebral Subluxation Complex is explored in Dr. Shanie Cahill’s lecture. This lecture covers the terminology and definitions of the VSC, giving students the language they need to be able to discuss this core of chiropractic treatment goal with animal owners. While the VSC is not defined in one way only, this lecture gives students several ways in which to define and discuss the complex that sets the tone for most explanations of how chiropractic becomes effective in our animal patients.

     

    Veterinary Pharmacology is a course in which chiropractic students can learn about the drugs on which many of their animal patients may depend for “normal” function. This course addresses the pharmacokinetics of each drug, the “indication” for use, the possible side effects, and how it is likely to inhibit the function of the chiropractic adjustment. While it is not in the scope of practice for animal chiropractors to change prescription drug regimens, it is important that they understand the complete function of these drugs prescribed by referring veterinarians in order that they protect the health of the animals they are treating. Upon completion of this course students will be equipped to determine whether an animal on medications is fit to have a chiropractic adjustment or not.

     

    Anatomy

     

    The osseous anatomy of the sacropelvic region is discussed, to include the topographical anatomic landmarks. The emphasis is placed on the horse and dog anatomy with individual variations of other animals discussed when appropriate. Breed anomalies are discussed in this lecture with regard to anatomical differentiations.

     

    Sacropelvic myology explores the muscle structure of the dog and the horse. This lecture covers muscles of the pelvis as they attach to the hind limb and as they are related to the thorax. This lecture includes some neuro anatomy. The goal of this lecture is to orient the student with the anatomy of the animals with which they will be working and to allow them to begin to consider the changes to these animals that cause the issues we address.

     

    Discussed in this lecture, the Neurology of the Pelvic Muscles allows the student to engage in understanding of the function of the muscles. This covers both structure and function of the nerves of the sacropelvic region with a focus on the horse and the dog. The goal of this lecture is to enable the student to comprehend what portions of the neuro axis he or she is affecting when making changes based on symptoms viewed in the dysfunction of the muscles of the sacropelvic region.

     

    Cranial myology; Identification of the anatomy of the specific animal is critical to effective, consistent treatment. In order to be able to repeat the results, you must be aware of the anatomical differences. This will also allow you to identify the compensatory changes that occur during the healing period as the animal excretes waste products from the tissues. At the end of this course the student will be able to identify each muscle of the skull and understand its function. Students will also have learned to look for neurological and mechanical changes to the cranial muscles as a means for defining symptoms and treatment.

     

    Cranial osseous anatomy; the goal of this lecture is to help the animal chiropractor be able to identify the bones of the skull in the dog and the horse. You may find it helpful that we will repeat some of the information more than once. You may also find some of the additional information helpful in committing to memory the actual locations and shapes of these bones along with their relationship to chiropractic as this study allows the animal chiropractor to make more definite judgments for treatment. Breed anomalies and differences will be noted in this lecture.

     

    (Neuroanatomy of the Cranial Nerves) The Cranial Nerves; the goal of this lecture is to increase the understanding of basic neurology and examination of the cranial nerves. Dr. Amy Hayek will explore the function and use of cranial nerve output as a marker to the doctor in determining treatment routes to spark interest in the neurological principles related to subluxation and the healing abilities of the animal chiropractor. We will use this information to expand on the neurological implications of the adjustment. This lecture will begin with the cranial nerves, as they are easily memorized and expand to their functions in terms of the neurological examination and how they are both affected by peripheral nerve damage and how they contribute to peripheral symptoms.

     

    The lecture Cervical Myology covers the muscles of the cervical region of the spine (the neck portion). This lecture explores the changes in direction and function of the muscles of the neck. Through this study we discover the ways in which animals use their neck to aid in orientation with the ground, with their environment and also how they act with and in response to that environment.

     

    Cervical Osseus Anatomy examines the boney structure of the neck in various species, specifically the dog and the horse. Some comparative anatomy is discussed in order to point out the function of anatomical differences found in each species as they relate to gravity and anatomical form. In order to understand behaviors and effects of the environment on the animal we look to form and individual changes in the boney anatomy. The goal of this lecture is to orient the animal chiropractic student to the osseous portion of the cervical spine in the dog and the horse…

     

    Cervical Neuro Anatomy looks closely at the nervous system as it pertains to orientation along the neck of the animal. This course examines each species and will allow the student to identify anatomical locations of nerves exiting the spine on the neck.

     

    Thoracic Osseus Anatomy lecture is designed to introduce the student to the osseus structure of the thorax of the dog and the horse. This opens the discussion regarding the most stable portion of the trunk to which the muscles of motion attach and achieve locomotion of the animal. The student will be able to identify osseous portions of each animal, including the spinous and rib portions and understand the purpose of each.

     

    Lumbar Osseus Anatomy lecture is designed to introduce the student to the osseus structure of the lumar region of the animal. This lecture will examine the function of the spinous structures in the lumbar region and their function in attachment for muscles. Breed anomalies will be discussed in this lecture. The goal of this lecture is to bring to animal chiropractic students a new-found appreciation for the lumbar spine in their animal patients.

     

    Thoracic Myology; The goals of this lecture are to familiarize the animal chiropractic student with the anatomy of the muscles and their function in the thoracic region. It is important that students begin to understand the relationships between muscle groups and the behaviors animals express when these muscles are functioning and when they are not. Learning the origin, insertion, action and innervation to each muscle will allow the student to begin to piece the whole picture together.

     

    Lumbar Myology; the goal of this lecture is to orient the animal chiropractic student with the muscles, action and relationships of the abdominal and lumbar spinal muscles to the behavior of the animal. The student will be able to explain the relationships of the muscle structures of this region in a manner a bit more complex than the extent to which current veterinary texts explore this region.

     

    Thoraco Lumbar Neuro Anatomy; the neurology of the trunk of the animal is a continuation of the neuroanatomy of the cervical region. Because of the cranial to caudal relationship of innervation to target muscle or organ, the previous spinal arrangement will always lead us to function in the following spinal arrangement. This is the beauty of the design set out by embryogenesis. The student should be able to identify the patterns of this arrangement.

     

    Syndesmology is a lecture that covers the tendon and ligament anatomy of the joints of the animal species pertinent to this course, the dog and the horse. The topic includes the passive stay apparatus in the horse with mention of several other species, and the complex ligament function in the spinal column. The goal of this lecture is to impress upon the student the wonder of how these ligaments are not simply passive ropes and pulleys but active through static function with a vast array of receptors for monitoring motor output and signaling sensory function. At the end of this class the student should be able to grasp the concept of the need for normal function of the tendon and ligament systems.

     

    The Thoracic Limb Myology; the goals of this lecture are to familiarize the animal chiropractic student with the anatomy of the muscles and their function in the thoracic limb. It is important that students begin to understand the relationships between muscle groups and the behaviors animals express when these muscles are functioning and when they are not. Learning the origin, insertion, action and innervation to each muscle will allow the student to begin to piece the whole picture together. At the end of this lecture the student will be able to identify not only normal function but abnormal limb motion due to muscle dysfunction.

     

    Thoracic Limb Osseous Anatomy is a course that covers the osseus anatomy of the thoracic limb of the horse and the dog. This course is designed with the goal of orienting the animal chiropractic student to the bones of the limbs and their function. This course will enable the student to identify the boney portion of the limbs of horse and dog and will also aid in understanding of the structure upon which the muscles are applied. At the end of this course the student will be able to identify each bone and explain its function and to which areas major muscle attachments occur. Breed differentiations will be discussed during this lecture.

     

    Thorcic Limb Neuro Anatomy; for as much as our understanding of neurology has developed and changed over the past 30 years, the neuroanatomy of the animals veterinarians treatment has stayed the same. However, some of the understanding of how the muscles which are innervated by the nerves has also improved. This course will look to the cutting edge of neurology in explaining the function of the nervous system on the thoracic limb and how it contributes to animal behavior.

     

    Pelvic Limb Myology is a course that examines the muscles of the limbs and their relationship to the forward motion of the animal. The student will be able to identify the function of the muscles in the pelvic leg and changes in behavior of the animal due to changes in the function of these muscles ability to perform their function.

     

     

     

    Pelvic Limb Osseous Anatomy is a course that covers the osseus anatomy of the pelvic limb of the horse and dog. This course is designed with the goal of orienting the animal chiropractic student to the bones of the limbs and their function. This course will enable the student to identify the boney portion of the limbs of horse and dog and will also aid in understanding of the structure upon which the muscles are applied. At the end of this course the student will be able to identify each bone and explain its function and to which areas major muscle attachments occur.

     

    Pelvic Limb Neuro Anatomy: The nerves of the hind leg are arranged, as the front limb, in an orderly fashion. All of the nerve fibers originate from the ventral spinal roots of the Lumbar spinal segments. We will review briefly the nervous system of the hip in order to address muscles that originate there but that affect the limb. The student will be able to identify the spinous sections from which the nerves arise and what may cause dysfunction in certain areas of the limb upon completion of this lecture as our goal is to help students gain confidence in their ability to restore function to this area.

     

    Neurology

     

    Receptors, Part 1 and 2 are courses that discuss the types of neuro receptors, since turning on these receptors is our primary job as animal chiropractors. Recognizing which receptors need to be switched on and which need to be turned off is not only a delicate procedure, but the only procedure worth doing. This course explores the ways in which the environment drives the learning and behavioral responses of our animal patients via the receptors with which it interacts. The student should realize by the end of this lecture that changes to the animal’s environment can retrain and heal the nervous system. Receptors 1 introduces the student to ways in which the animals receptors are stimulated and how the receptors function, including muscle spindle cells, Pacinian corpusles, and the like. Receptors 2 classifies the receptors based on several criteria including type of information, location and neurotransmitter used. The student will complete these two courses with a better understanding of the environmental effects on the nervous system of the animals we serve.

     

    Cutaneous Innervation is a course that illustrates the innervation of the skin of the horse and the dog. It outlines the individual nervous pathways from the spinal column to the areas of the skin affected by each spinal segment. This course drives home the need to retain this information for clinical practice and identifies several scenarios in which the information can help the student recognize cutaneous issues as segmental dysfunction and de- afferentation in the animal patient. Students will complete this course with a new appreciation for the skin as an organ system and its indications that aid in identifying the issues in their animal patients.

     

    Neurology of Pain; this course explores the actual with the perceived levels of pain in our animal patients. What we assign as pain may not be exactly pain in our animal patients and may in fact be other behavior activities unrelated to pain. We will look at the neurologic origins of pain and the means by which we can measure pain in our animal patients. At the completion of this course the student will be able to identify means by which to judge pain levels in their animal patients and plan an order in which to address those levels of pain.

     

    Applied Animal Chiropractic Neurology 1 and 2