Animal Chiropractic Education Source

A.C.E.S.

10771 Highway 6

Meridian, TX 76665

Email:

Admin@AnimalChiropracticEducation.com

Phone:

(843) 900-1502

Animal Chiropractic Education Source is an equal opportunity educational school. Students are accepted based on their previous level of education alone and not based on race, religion, sex, or diagnosed handicaps. 

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Animal Chiropractic 101 Audit

Any doctor that has previously completed a program recognized by the AVCA may audit any of the laboratory modules for either CE or to study for recertification. Laboratory 1 covers sacropelvic and cranial cervical regions of the spine. Laboratory 2 reviews the whole spine, while Laboratory 3 includes extremities. Auditing students will be expected to arrive prior to 1 on Thursday and stay until 5 on Sunday.  If auditing Laboratory 3 they may opt to skip Sundays sessions. 

 

Animal Chiropractic 101 Audit

Certificate: AVCA

Duration: 20 hours

Assessments: No

Skill Level: Certified Animal Chiropractor

Lectures: 0

Quizzes: 0

Language: English

Animal Chiropractic 101 Audit

$1,259.95Price
  • Animal Chiropractic 101 Audit

    Depending on the laboratory session chosen, the student will be expected to attend all sessions except for the written and practical examinations.  All laboratory sessions are taught by AVCA certified doctors that actively practice Animal Chiropractic.  The student – teacher ratio is never more than 5/1.

    Sacro – Pelvic Canine Technique lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the sacro-pelvic and tail regions of the dog.  The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the canine patient.  They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction.  The students will observe pictures as well as perform the techniques on stuffed canine replicas.

    Control of the Canine Laboratory will be done with live canine patients.  Students must be able to demonstrate proper restraint techniques.  Control is an integral part of the handling of animals and is critical to safety of the handler and the animal chiropractic practitioner.  Students will be able to demonstrate the proper techniques to lift a dog onto a table, to muzzle a dog with a commercial muzzle, leash or gauze and to be able to hold the dog’s face by the cheeks or manually restrain a dog’s muzzle.  They will be able to show the proper technique to place and hold a dog in both lateral and sternal recumbency.

    Canine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the Sacro – pelvic region will be done with live canine patients.  Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor.  In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (Tuber Sacrale (PSIS), Tuber Coxae (ASIS), Wing of the Ilium, Sacral Apex, etc), articulations (Coxofemoral Joint, Sacroiliac Joint, Lumbosacral Joint), ligaments (Sacrotuberous ligament, Supra spinous ligament, etc) and muscles (Gluteus superficialis, Longissimus dorsi, etc)

    Canine Sacropelvic Technique Laboratory will be done with live canine patients.  Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live dog. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the dog, the handler and themselves.  Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the pelvis and tail.

    Canine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the sacro-pelvic area will be done on live canine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available.  The joints of the pelvis and tail will be examined from a motion analysis point of view. The process of determining leg length in the canine patient will be examined.

    Canine Technique Review Laboratory on the sacropelvic region will be done with articulated skeletal models.   Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the model.   Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the pelvis and tail.

    Osseous Anatomy Laboratory of the sacrolpelvic region will include the use of numerous species of skeletal models.  Students will identify landmarks on the bones.  These include protuberances, joint surfaces and muscle attachment.  Form and function will be discussed as the students compare the bones and joint angles of the different species.                                                          

    Speeder Board Laboratory will help the student learn the meaning of the equation f=ma as it applies to animal chiropractic work.  Developing speed and proper technique is important. Joints involved in the thrust must be locked out.  Back and body position must be correct.  Stabilization must be provided as the thrust is applied.  Contact points utilized in animal chiropractic may differ from those in the human profession and will include the guarded thumb, pisiform contact, thenar contact, hypothenar contact, web or metacarpophalangeal joint contact and the finger pull.

    Sacro – Pelvic Equine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the sacro-pelvic and tail regions of the horse.  The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the equine patient.  They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction.  The students will observe pictures of the setups on the live horse as well as on a skeleton of a horse.

    Control of Horse Laboratory will be done with live equine patients.  Students must be able to demonstrate proper restraint techniques.  Control is an integral part of the handling of animals and is critical to safety of the handler and the animal chiropractic practitioner.  Students should be able to demonstrate how to enter a horse’s stall and place a halter on it, how to hold the lead rope correctly when holding a horse and how to tie a horse up using a quick release knot.  They should be able to pick up and clean a hoof with a hoof pick, apply a nose twitch, an under the lip twine and a stud chain correctly and safely.  The student will be able to walk, trot and back a horse.

    Equine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the Sacro – pelvic region will be done with live equine patients.  Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor.  In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (Tuber Sacrale (PSIS), Tuber Coxae (ASIS), Wing of the Ilium, Sacral Apex, etc), articulations (Coxofemoral Joint, Sacroiliac Joint, Lumbosacral Joint), ligaments (Sacrotuberous ligament, Supra spinous ligament, etc) and muscles (Gluteus superficialis, Longissimus dorsi, etc).

    Equine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the sacropelvic area will be done on live equine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available.  The joints of the pelvis and tail will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.   The process of determining leg length in the equine patient will be examined.

    Equine Sacropelvic Technique Laboratory will be done with live equine patients.  Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live horse. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the horse, the handler and themselves.  Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were horse owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the pelvis and tail.

    Report of Findings, “Show Me” Chiropractic Lecture will discuss the topics that should be included in an animal chiropractic report of findings including but not limited to chiropractor’s credentials, innate and how the animal might respond to the adjustment.  Rehab and post adjustment protocols will be discussed as well as ways that the owner can tell if the adjustment helped the animal.

    Cranial Cervical Canine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the cranial and cervical regions of the dog.  The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the canine patient.  They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction.  The students will observe pictures as well as perform the techniques on stuffed canine replicas.

    Canine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the cranial cervical region will be done with live canine patients.  Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor.  In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (mandible, occiput, C1 thru C7), articulations (temporomandibular joint, alanto-occipital joint, intervertebral joints of C1 thru C7, cervical zygapophyseal joints), ligaments (supra spinous ligament, ligamentum flavum), and muscles (masseter , brachiocephalicus, orbicularis oris ).

    Canine Cranial Cervical Technique Laboratory will be done with live canine patients.  Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live dog.  Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the dog, the handler and themselves.  Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the head and neck.

    Canine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the cranial cervical area will be done on live canine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available.  The joints of the head and neck will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.   The process of determining leg length in the canine patient will be examined.

    Canine Technique Review Laboratory on the cranial cervical region will be done with articulated skeletal models.   Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the model.   Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the head and neck.

    Ossesous Anatomy Laboratory of the cranial cervical region will include the use of numerous species of skeletal models.  Students will identify landmarks on the bones.  These include protuberences, joint surfaces and muscle attachment.  Form and function will be discussed as the students compare the bones and joint angles of the different species.

    Canine Neurological Examination Laboratory will be performed on live canine patients.  Chiropractic is neurology.  As the students make the clients more aware of movement owners may become more aware of their dog’s activities.  It is important to show and explain problems that you see prior to the first adjustment.  The animal chiropractor must never assume that another doctor has examined the patient and noted all of the neurological problems prior to the adjustment.  The examination must include observation of mental status, posture, gait, and musculoskeletal symmetry or lack of.  Cranial nerves, spinal nerves and postural reflexes will be examined by the student. 

    Cranial Cervical Equine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the cranial and cervical regions of the horse.  The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the equine patient.  They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction.  The students will observe pictures of the set ups on live animals as well as on the skeleton of a horse.

    Equine Neurological Examination Laboratory will be performed on live equine patients.  Chiropractic is neurology.  As the students make the clients more aware of movement owners may become more aware of their horse’s activities.  It is important to show and explain problems that you see prior to the first adjustment.  The animal chiropractor must never assume that another doctor has examined the patient and noted all of the neurological problems prior to the adjustment.  The examination must include observation of mental status, posture, gait, and musculoskeletal symmetry or lack of.  Cranial nerves, spinal nerves and postural reflexes will be examined by the student. 

    Equine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the cranial and cervical regions will be done with live equine patients.  Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor.  In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (mandible, occiput, C1 thru C7), articulations (temporomandibular joint, alanto-occipital joint, intervertebral joints of C1 thru C7, cervical zygapophyseal joints), ligaments (supra spinous ligament, ligamentum flavum), and muscles (masseter , brachiocephalicus, orbicularis oris ).

    Equine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the cranial and cervical areas will be done on live equine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available.  The joints of the head and neck will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.   The process of determining leg length in the equine patient will be examined.

    Equine Cranial and Cervical Technique Laboratory will be done with live equine patients.  Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live horse.  Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the horse, the handler and themselves.  Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were horse owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the head and neck.

    Equine Gait Analysis Laboratory will be done utilizing live equine patients.   The student will watch horse walk – right to left, left to right, away, towards and watch horse trot – right to left, left to right, away, towards as they attempt to identify problems.  They will use available tools to analyze gait.  These include but are not limited to footprints in the sand, walk beside and or watch someone else walk beside the horse, listen to the foot beats, change the center of gravity and surface.

    Canine gait analysis laboratory will be done utilizing live canine patients.   The student will watch dog walk – right to left, left to right, away, towards and watch dog trot – right to left, left to right, away, towards as they attempt to identify problems.  They will use available tools to analyze gait.  These include but are not limited to paw prints in the sand, walk beside and or watch someone else walk beside the dog, listen to the foot beats, change the center of gravity and surface.

    Implementing Animal Chiropractic Lecture discusses ways to begin an animal chiropractic practice.  Topics include the legalities of practice and some of the paperwork required in animal medical records and hippa.  The instructors discuss advertising and forms that they use and some that others use.

    Thoracolumbar Canine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the thorax and lumbar regions of the dog.  The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the canine patient.  They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction.  The students will observe pictures as well as perform the techniques on stuffed canine replicas.

    Canine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the thoracolumbar region will be done with live canine patients.  Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor.  In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (spinous process of thoracic vertebrae, transverse process of lumbar vertebrae, sternum), articulations (intervertebral joints, costovertebral joints), ligaments (supra spinous ligament, ligamentum flavum), and muscles (rhomboideus, triceps brachii, longus colli, transverses abdominis, psoas major).

    Canine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the thoracolumbar area will be done on live canine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available.  The joints of the thorax and lumbar region will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.  

    Canine Technique Review Laboratory on the thoracolumbar region will be done with articulated skeletal models.   Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the model.   Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the thorax and lumbar region.

    Canine Thoracolumbar Technique Laboratory will be done with live canine patients.  Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live dog.  Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the dog, the handler and themselves.  Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the thorax and lumbar region. 

    Ossesous Anatomy Laboratory of the thoracolumbar region will include the use of numerous species of skeletal models.  Students will identify landmarks on the bones.  These include protuberences, joint surfaces and muscle attachment.  Form and function will be discussed as the students compare the bones and joint angles of the different species.

    Thoracolumbar Equine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the thorax and lumbar region of the horse.  The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the equine patient.  They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to ensure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction.  The students will observe pictures of the set ups on live animals as well as on the skeleton of a horse.

    The purpose of the Equine Saddle Fit Lab is to allow students to be able to discuss saddle fit with confidence to the client.  They should be able to identify symmetry of saddle vs. horse. They should be able to check for tree health, protuberences and other defects that would make the saddle unsafe for horse and rider.  Parts of the basic Western and English saddle will be identified.  Discussion will identify ways to determine if a saddle fits the horse.  The student will be able to place a saddle on a live horse.

    Equine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the thorax and lumbar areas will be done on live equine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available.  The joints of the thorax and lumbar area will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.  

    Equine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the thoracolumbar region will be done with live equine patients.  Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor.  In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (spinous process of thoracic vertebrae, transverse process of lumbar vertebrae, sternum), articulations (intervertebral joints, costovertebral joints), ligaments (supra spinous ligament, ligamentum flavum), and muscles (rhomboideus, triceps brachii, longus colli, transverses abdominis, psoas major).

    Equine Thoracolumbar Technique Laboratory will be done with live equine patients.  Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live horse.  Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the horse, the handler and themselves.  Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were horse owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the thorax and lumbar region.

    Extremity Canine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the thorax and lumbar regions of the dog.  The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the canine patient.  They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction.  The students will observe pictures as well as perform the techniques on stuffed canine replicas.

    Canine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the extremities will be done with live canine patients.  Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor.  In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, femur),  articulations (carpal joint, stifle joint, hock joint), ligaments (patellar tendon, calcaneal tendon) and muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, common digital extensor, gluteals -Superficial, Medial, and Deep)

    Canine Extremity Technique Laboratory will be done with live canine patients.  Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live dog. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the dog, the handler and themselves.  Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of both the front and back legs.

    Canine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the extremities will be done on live canine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation.  Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available.  The joints of the both front and back legs will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.  

    Ossesous Anatomy Laboratory of the extremities will include the use of numerous species of skeletal models.  Students will identify landmarks on the bones.  These include protuberences, joint surfaces and muscle attachment.  Form and function will be discussed as the students compare the bones and joint angles of the different species.

    Extremity Equine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the front and back legs of the horse.  The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the equine patient.  They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction.  The students will observe pictures of the set ups on live animals as well as on the skeleton of a horse.

     

    Equine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the extremities will be done with live equine patients.  Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor.  In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, femur),  articulations (carpal joint, stifle joint, hock joint), ligaments (patellar tendon, calcaneal tendon) and muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, common digital extensor, gluteals -Superficial, Medial, and Deep)

    Equine Extremity Technique Laboratory will be done with live equine patients.  Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live horse. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the horse, the handler and themselves.  Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction.  They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were horse owner’s and untrained technicians.  There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings.  The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the front and back leg.  Students may opt out of the rear leg if they are uncomfortable.

    Equine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the legs will be done on live equine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation.  Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available.  The joints of the both front and back legs will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.