Animal Chiropractic Education Source

A.C.E.S.

10771 Highway 6

Meridian, TX 76665

Email:

Admin@AnimalChiropracticEducation.com

Phone:

(843) 900-1502

Animal Chiropractic Education Source is an equal opportunity educational school. Students are accepted based on their previous level of education alone and not based on race, religion, sex, or diagnosed handicaps. 

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Animal Chiropractic 101 is the premier entry course to Animal Chiropractic.  

AC 101 meets the requirements for AVCA certification, Colorado DC licensing, Minnesota, and Oklahoma licensing. A.C.E.S. graduates continually have the highest scores on the AVCA certification exam.  Basic education at A.C.E.S. includes the completion of 129 hours of online presentations and only 3 trips to the Ranch in Meridian for 111 hours of hands-on laboratories.  The student may choose the speed with which he or she completes each section.  A.C.E.S. labs include supervised animal adjusting, not just set-ups.  Evening discussions on marketing and practice building help our graduates go home after the first module and begin to implement Animal Chiropractic into their practice.  If you are comparing this program to others make sure you are comparing Apples to Apples.  

Students’ access to this equipment is included in the cost of the course: 

Downloadable notes for on-line portion

Access to online lectures for 2 years from the time of enrollment

Bound notes for laboratory sessions

Adjusting bale that is used for both canine and equine adjusting.  Available to take home at course completion.

Canine Spine that helps the doctor learn Animal Chiropractic and show their clients the benefits of Animal Chiropractic.  

Available after laboratory 1.

Speeder Board used to practice the thrust and stabilization needed for proper adjusting technique.  

Available after laboratory 1.

Marketing materials

Access to Doctors Rounds and private student Facebook pages.

Animal Chiropractic 101 is only open to licensed veterinarians or chiropractors, and to individuals who are currently students of a veterinary or chiropractic college and are within 2 years of obtaining a license in one of these professions. 

 

Laboratories will have a student/teacher ratio no greater than 5:1. Laboratory instructors must be AVCA certified doctors with a minimum of 2 years practice and an animal population comparable to those which they are teaching. Location of the laboratory and live classroom lectures will be in Meridian, Texas. You can view laboratory dates on our Google calendar.  Lab 1 meets the first week of each month, while Labs 2 and 3 meet every other month during the week following Lab 1. Labs begin on Thursday at 1 p.m. and finish at 5 p.m. on Sunday.  Come to the labs at your convenience. Finish as quickly as 2 months or as long as 2 years.

Registrants will provide copies of license or a transcript from the school of their doctoral degree, and a picture ID photo.

 

Animal Chiropractic 101

Certificate: Allows sitting for AVCA exam, Fulfills Minnesota, Oklahoma and Colorado Animal Chiropractic laws

 

Duration: 240 hours

Assessments: Yes

Skill Level: Chiropractor, Veterinarian, Chiropractic Student, Veterinary Student

Lectures: 90

Quizzes: 90

Language: English

Animal Chiropractic 101

$8,499.95Price
  • Animal Chiropractic Module 101, 102, and 103 Course Descriptions

    Rev. 2019 October

    Pre-requisites: Licensure to practice Veterinary Medicine OR Chiropractic; students within 2 years of completing courses for Doctor of Veterinary Medicine or Doctor of Chiropractic.

    Credits: 240 hours total

    Locations: 129 online lecture hours

    111 On-site laboratory hours held in Meridian, Texas

    Courses are distributed throughout the modules as described in the syllabus. Courses must be taken in order, with passing scores in each course before the student may continue. Students have a window of 2 years from the date of registration to complete the entire curriculum.  We understand that Life happens and so an extension is available for an extra fee.

    Schedule: Lecture courses are on-going and available at the student’s leisure. Each laboratory module is available numerous times a year. Forty hours of online lecture material must be completed prior to attending each laboratory. Students may attend labs at any time when they are offered; but must attend them in order.  Laboratory 1 is offered 12 times a year.  Laboratory 2 and 3 are available 6 times a year.  Check the calendar for exact dates.  

    Exams: Open book quizzes are presented at the completion of each lecture. A passing score of 90% is needed to proceed to the next lecture.  A closed book Scantron exam is given on the Friday of each laboratory module.  Practical Technique exams are given on Sunday of each module including both short answer and practical stations.  Practical exams must be completed with a passing score of 75%.  The combined score of the Scantron and quizzes must average 75%.  Should it be necessary Scantron exams may be repeated at the end of the module after extra help from instructors with a fee of $25 per repeated exam.

    Extra credit and make up exams: Do Not Exist as students must pass each course before proceeding to the next level.

    Proper Attire: When attending laboratory weekends, appropriate attire is expected.  The animals being worked on in class will belong to someone.  Please respect them for coming in.  Closed toed shoes are required for all equine labs.

    Audio/Video Recording: Recording devices are not allowed during laboratory sessions. The court has ruled that a professor’s voice and physical image are his or her own personal property, and thus recording the information is expressly prohibited.

    Course Objectives:

    1) Students will be presented with some of the most in-depth animal anatomic terminology which they should be able to use when conversing with other health care professionals and should understand so that they can convey the information to their clients.

    2)Students will be able to use the knowledge they acquire regarding anatomy to provide a chiropractic assessment.

    3)The potential dangers of working with animals will be discussed with the students and they in turn will be able to demonstrate their knowledge through avoidance of injury when working with animals.

    4)Listed below are the individual lectures and coursework presented to students throughout this program. Students will be able to demonstrate their mastery of these skills and this knowledge upon completion of this course.

    5)Students will be presented with practice management information that they will be able to utilize and demonstrate during this course.

    Chiropractic and Veterinary Specific Courses

    Introduction to Veterinary Lingo encompass the terminology of veterinary medicine that applies to chiropractic work with animals. The terminology is introductory for chiropractic doctors and includes anatomical terminology, breed and species information, and vital sign information. Also included are vertebral formulas for the common species discussed. The goal of this course is to help the student feel at ease with new terminology outside of his or her usual practice setting.

     

    Introduction to Chiropractic Lingo for Veterinarians is a course in which licensed veterinarians are introduced to terminology in chiropractic medicine that is important for providing chiropractic care to animals. This course will introduce subjects such as Line of Correction (LOC), pisiform, thenar, and other information important for understanding many of the techniques and treatment modalities in chiropractic as it applies to animals. The goal of this course is to help the student feel at ease with new terminology outside of his or her usual practice setting.

     

    Introduction to Chiropractic Lingo part 1 by Dr. Bill Ormston is a lecture introducing the nuances of chiropractic to doctors who are not familiar with these terms, particularly for our veterinary doctors. In this lecture Dr. Ormston focuses on emphasizing the need to be able to speak the language effectively in order to communicate with other doctors. Topics covered include the underlying philosophy that pervades chiropractic lingo used in discussion of patients, definitions for subluxation complex, the innate, the core principles of chiropractic, myopathology, histopathology, pathophysiology, motion palpation, listings, and neuropathophysiology and kinesiopahtophysiology. The student will complete this course understanding the clearly different mindset and perspective of chiropractic from that of traditional medicine.

     

    Vertebral Subluxation Complex is explored in Dr. Shanie Cahill’s lecture. This lecture covers the terminology and definitions of the VSC, giving students the language they need to be able to discuss this core of chiropractic treatment goal with animal owners. While the VSC is not defined in one way only, this lecture gives students several ways in which to define and discuss the complex that sets the tone for most explanations of how chiropractic becomes effective in our animal patients.

     

    Veterinary Pharmacology is a course in which chiropractic students can learn about the drugs on which many of their animal patients may depend for “normal” function. This course addresses the pharmacokinetics of each drug, the “indication” for use, the possible side effects, and how it is likely to inhibit the function of the chiropractic adjustment. While it is not in the scope of practice for animal chiropractors to change prescription drug regimens, it is important that they understand the complete function of these drugs prescribed by referring veterinarians in order that they protect the health of the animals they are treating. Upon completion of this course students will be equipped to determine whether an animal on medications is fit to have a chiropractic adjustment or not.

     

    Anatomy

     

    The osseous anatomy of the sacropelvic region is discussed, to include the topographical anatomic landmarks. The emphasis is placed on the horse and dog anatomy with individual variations of other animals discussed when appropriate. Breed anomalies are discussed in this lecture with regard to anatomical differentiations.

     

    Sacropelvic myology explores the muscle structure of the dog and the horse. This lecture covers muscles of the pelvis as they attach to the hind limb and as they are related to the thorax. This lecture includes some neuro anatomy. The goal of this lecture is to orient the student with the anatomy of the animals with which they will be working and to allow them to begin to consider the changes to these animals that cause the issues we address.

     

    Discussed in this lecture, the Neurology of the Pelvic Muscles allows the student to engage in understanding of the function of the muscles. This covers both structure and function of the nerves of the sacropelvic region with a focus on the horse and the dog. The goal of this lecture is to enable the student to comprehend what portions of the neuro axis he or she is affecting when making changes based on symptoms viewed in the dysfunction of the muscles of the sacropelvic region.

     

    Cranial myology; Identification of the anatomy of the specific animal is critical to effective, consistent treatment. In order to be able to repeat the results, you must be aware of the anatomical differences. This will also allow you to identify the compensatory changes that occur during the healing period as the animal excretes waste products from the tissues. At the end of this course the student will be able to identify each muscle of the skull and understand its function. Students will also have learned to look for neurological and mechanical changes to the cranial muscles as a means for defining symptoms and treatment.

     

    Cranial osseous anatomy; the goal of this lecture is to help the animal chiropractor be able to identify the bones of the skull in the dog and the horse. You may find it helpful that we will repeat some of the information more than once. You may also find some of the additional information helpful in committing to memory the actual locations and shapes of these bones along with their relationship to chiropractic as this study allows the animal chiropractor to make more definite judgments for treatment. Breed anomalies and differences will be noted in this lecture.

     

    (Neuroanatomy of the Cranial Nerves) The Cranial Nerves; the goal of this lecture is to increase the understanding of basic neurology and examination of the cranial nerves. Dr. Amy Hayek will explore the function and use of cranial nerve output as a marker to the doctor in determining treatment routes to spark interest in the neurological principles related to subluxation and the healing abilities of the animal chiropractor. We will use this information to expand on the neurological implications of the adjustment. This lecture will begin with the cranial nerves, as they are easily memorized and expand to their functions in terms of the neurological examination and how they are both affected by peripheral nerve damage and how they contribute to peripheral symptoms.

     

    The lecture Cervical Myology covers the muscles of the cervical region of the spine (the neck portion). This lecture explores the changes in direction and function of the muscles of the neck. Through this study we discover the ways in which animals use their neck to aid in orientation with the ground, with their environment and also how they act with and in response to that environment.

     

    Cervical Osseus Anatomy examines the boney structure of the neck in various species, specifically the dog and the horse. Some comparative anatomy is discussed in order to point out the function of anatomical differences found in each species as they relate to gravity and anatomical form. In order to understand behaviors and effects of the environment on the animal we look to form and individual changes in the boney anatomy. The goal of this lecture is to orient the animal chiropractic student to the osseous portion of the cervical spine in the dog and the horse…

     

    Cervical Neuro Anatomy looks closely at the nervous system as it pertains to orientation along the neck of the animal. This course examines each species and will allow the student to identify anatomical locations of nerves exiting the spine on the neck.

     

    Thoracic Osseus Anatomy lecture is designed to introduce the student to the osseus structure of the thorax of the dog and the horse. This opens the discussion regarding the most stable portion of the trunk to which the muscles of motion attach and achieve locomotion of the animal. The student will be able to identify osseous portions of each animal, including the spinous and rib portions and understand the purpose of each.

     

    Lumbar Osseus Anatomy lecture is designed to introduce the student to the osseus structure of the lumar region of the animal. This lecture will examine the function of the spinous structures in the lumbar region and their function in attachment for muscles. Breed anomalies will be discussed in this lecture. The goal of this lecture is to bring to animal chiropractic students a new-found appreciation for the lumbar spine in their animal patients.

     

    Thoracic Myology; The goals of this lecture are to familiarize the animal chiropractic student with the anatomy of the muscles and their function in the thoracic region. It is important that students begin to understand the relationships between muscle groups and the behaviors animals express when these muscles are functioning and when they are not. Learning the origin, insertion, action and innervation to each muscle will allow the student to begin to piece the whole picture together.

     

    Lumbar Myology; the goal of this lecture is to orient the animal chiropractic student with the muscles, action and relationships of the abdominal and lumbar spinal muscles to the behavior of the animal. The student will be able to explain the relationships of the muscle structures of this region in a manner a bit more complex than the extent to which current veterinary texts explore this region.

     

    Thoraco Lumbar Neuro Anatomy; the neurology of the trunk of the animal is a continuation of the neuroanatomy of the cervical region. Because of the cranial to caudal relationship of innervation to target muscle or organ, the previous spinal arrangement will always lead us to function in the following spinal arrangement. This is the beauty of the design set out by embryogenesis. The student should be able to identify the patterns of this arrangement.

     

    Syndesmology is a lecture that covers the tendon and ligament anatomy of the joints of the animal species pertinent to this course, the dog and the horse. The topic includes the passive stay apparatus in the horse with mention of several other species, and the complex ligament function in the spinal column. The goal of this lecture is to impress upon the student the wonder of how these ligaments are not simply passive ropes and pulleys but active through static function with a vast array of receptors for monitoring motor output and signaling sensory function. At the end of this class the student should be able to grasp the concept of the need for normal function of the tendon and ligament systems.

     

    The Thoracic Limb Myology; the goals of this lecture are to familiarize the animal chiropractic student with the anatomy of the muscles and their function in the thoracic limb. It is important that students begin to understand the relationships between muscle groups and the behaviors animals express when these muscles are functioning and when they are not. Learning the origin, insertion, action and innervation to each muscle will allow the student to begin to piece the whole picture together. At the end of this lecture the student will be able to identify not only normal function but abnormal limb motion due to muscle dysfunction.

     

    Thoracic Limb Osseous Anatomy is a course that covers the osseus anatomy of the thoracic limb of the horse and the dog. This course is designed with the goal of orienting the animal chiropractic student to the bones of the limbs and their function. This course will enable the student to identify the boney portion of the limbs of horse and dog and will also aid in understanding of the structure upon which the muscles are applied. At the end of this course the student will be able to identify each bone and explain its function and to which areas major muscle attachments occur. Breed differentiations will be discussed during this lecture.

     

    Thorcic Limb Neuro Anatomy; for as much as our understanding of neurology has developed and changed over the past 30 years, the neuroanatomy of the animals veterinarians treatment has stayed the same. However, some of the understanding of how the muscles which are innervated by the nerves has also improved. This course will look to the cutting edge of neurology in explaining the function of the nervous system on the thoracic limb and how it contributes to animal behavior.

     

    Pelvic Limb Myology is a course that examines the muscles of the limbs and their relationship to the forward motion of the animal. The student will be able to identify the function of the muscles in the pelvic leg and changes in behavior of the animal due to changes in the function of these muscles ability to perform their function.

     

     

     

    Pelvic Limb Osseous Anatomy is a course that covers the osseus anatomy of the pelvic limb of the horse and dog. This course is designed with the goal of orienting the animal chiropractic student to the bones of the limbs and their function. This course will enable the student to identify the boney portion of the limbs of horse and dog and will also aid in understanding of the structure upon which the muscles are applied. At the end of this course the student will be able to identify each bone and explain its function and to which areas major muscle attachments occur.

     

    Pelvic Limb Neuro Anatomy: The nerves of the hind leg are arranged, as the front limb, in an orderly fashion. All of the nerve fibers originate from the ventral spinal roots of the Lumbar spinal segments. We will review briefly the nervous system of the hip in order to address muscles that originate there but that affect the limb. The student will be able to identify the spinous sections from which the nerves arise and what may cause dysfunction in certain areas of the limb upon completion of this lecture as our goal is to help students gain confidence in their ability to restore function to this area.

     

    Neurology

     

    Receptors, Part 1 and 2 are courses that discuss the types of neuro receptors, since turning on these receptors is our primary job as animal chiropractors. Recognizing which receptors need to be switched on and which need to be turned off is not only a delicate procedure, but the only procedure worth doing. This course explores the ways in which the environment drives the learning and behavioral responses of our animal patients via the receptors with which it interacts. The student should realize by the end of this lecture that changes to the animal’s environment can retrain and heal the nervous system. Receptors 1 introduces the student to ways in which the animals receptors are stimulated and how the receptors function, including muscle spindle cells, Pacinian corpusles, and the like. Receptors 2 classifies the receptors based on several criteria including type of information, location and neurotransmitter used. The student will complete these two courses with a better understanding of the environmental effects on the nervous system of the animals we serve.

     

    Cutaneous Innervation is a course that illustrates the innervation of the skin of the horse and the dog. It outlines the individual nervous pathways from the spinal column to the areas of the skin affected by each spinal segment. This course drives home the need to retain this information for clinical practice and identifies several scenarios in which the information can help the student recognize cutaneous issues as segmental dysfunction and de- afferentation in the animal patient. Students will complete this course with a new appreciation for the skin as an organ system and its indications that aid in identifying the issues in their animal patients.

     

    Neurology of Pain; this course explores the actual with the perceived levels of pain in our animal patients. What we assign as pain may not be exactly pain in our animal patients and may in fact be other behavior activities unrelated to pain. We will look at the neurologic origins of pain and the means by which we can measure pain in our animal patients. At the completion of this course the student will be able to identify means by which to judge pain levels in their animal patients and plan an order in which to address those levels of pain.

     

    Applied Animal Chiropractic Neurology 1 and 2 will provide knowledge that embraces current neurology and physics theories including String Theory, Entanglement Theory, and the laws of gravity. These two courses will replace the idea that pressure on the spinal cord is the cause of neurological disease. They will make use of language consistent with current medical knowledge and concepts that allow you to understand current research in neurology. This will enable you to discuss the concept of chiropractic in terms other than popping bones with your clients, and your colleagues. We will begin from the beginning and review terminology and mechanisms with which you should already be familiar. Students will be equipped with the knowledge of the nervous system necessary to address challenges of both musculoskeletal and neurological dysfunction in their animal patients.

     

     

     

    Applied Animal Chiropractic The Saga is a course in which we explore the autonomic system in depth. Through it we help the student view the nervous system not as two or three entities that give one another a call every now and then, but as a integrated system of checks and balances. Importantly, the levels of stimulation vary in our animal patients dependent upon not just their environments but how their environment impacts them as an individual within their breed and species. When students finish this course they will be able to identify both the physical aspects of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and the balances and the imbalances of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems and be equipped to address these in a meaningful way to help bring their patients back into better balance.

     

    Dentistry

     

    Differences in Dental Anatomy; in the animal world, the mouth, head, face and jaw are a primary source of sensory input to the brain. The jaw, while developed similarly from the brachial arches in the embryo, is used in different ways for prey and predator. Different uses of the jaw, mouth and teeth are related to different behaviors and these anatomical parts developed differently as a result. Their input cause different brain functions related to movement. The goal of this course is to open the student to discussion and realization that the jaw is an important part of the anatomy of the animal that drives brain function. One of the reasons jaw type is used in taxonomic classification is due to the ways in which it shapes the animal species. This lecture will bring this to the front of student thought. At the end of this lecture students will be able to identify animal behaviors based upon how they are shaped by this portion of the anatomy.

     

    Equine Dentistry and Chiropractic is a course that presents some chiropractic concepts with some practical application to equine dental maintenance. The equine professional will be able to use this information to recognize dental and chiropractic issues in equine wellness.

     

    Foot Anatomy and Function

     

    The course in Shoeing and Trimming is designed to cover the ideas about which trimming and shoeing help domestic animals approximate the evolutionary hoof they were designed to use to support their size and allow them to move swiftly. In this lecture different abnormal elements of equine hoof growth will be explored and we will discuss the environmental influences that shaped those feet to be the way they are. We will compare some hoof changes to the way in which they came about and how they relate to other hoof distortions seen in horses. We will also discuss extensively the neurobiomechanics that are unique to the equine hoof and how that shapes the animal’s life.

     

    The Equine Hoof is a lecture that will attempt to expose the student to the following concepts: Anatomy of the equine hoof, biomechanics of the equine hoof and how these biomechanics affect leg biomechanics, how leg biomechanics affect the hoof, some concepts of shoeing and when it is rational to consider shoeing a horse. Because the goal of the animal chiropractor is to allow the animal to heal, rather than to simply decrease the presence of a symptom, there are situations where the idea of shoeing is unreasonable. At the completion of this course students will have gained an insight into the function of the single toed ungulate hoof biomechanics and gain an appreciation for the immense importance of the hoof in these animals.

     

    Leg Length is a lecture that will be explained in greater detail during the laboratory session for this module. This lecture by Dr. Ormston explains the method of measuring leg length of the animal and using it as a means of determining subluxation in the upper cervicals and the hip. This lecture explains the technique and the philosophy behind using this technique. In addition to this Dr. O explains to the student how the human hip anatomy differs from the animal hip anatomy.

     

    Pathology

     

    Sacropelvic Pathology 1 is a course given by Dr. Ormston that details cases in pathology for animal chiropractors from a veterinary standpoint. This lecture is designed to acquaint the animal chiropractor with many of the situations that present to animal chiropractors every day with regard to sacropelvic or the appearance of sacropelvic chiropractic issues. The lecture will also explore several of the less common pathological situations that may once in a while find their way to the animal chiropractor. These lectures are designed to help the animal chiropractor avoid the pitfalls of addressing cases that may be outside of their scope of expertise and practice, and to help them recognize when a case is clearly chiropractic and when it is not. This lecture will discuss radiographic findings in the sacropelvic region. While DCs will not be expected to diagnose radiographs in the animal patient, recognizing these findings is necessary in order to avoid taking referral cases from veterinarians who don’t recognize these issues.

     

    Sacropelvic Pathology 2 is a course given by Dr. Ormston that, like Sacropelvic Pathology 1, explores the musculoskeletal pathology of the animal with regard to the sacropelvic region and looks at both some common complaints that are presented to the animal chiropractor and some unusual complaints that may occur. This course is designed for the animal chiropractor to be able to understand when it is appropriate to refer the animal to a licensed professional who can treat the uncommon issues, and when it is appropriate to address the more common pathology issues using chiropractic. At the end of this course the student should be comfortable seeing patients on initial visits to determine whether they are going to make good chiropractic candidates or whether they will need to see other professional help. This lecture will discuss radiographic findings in the sacropelvic region. While DCs will not be expected to diagnose radiographs in the animal patient, recognizing these findings is necessary in order to avoid taking referral cases from veterinarians who don’t recognize these issues.

     

    Cranial Cervical Pathology 1 is a course given by Dr. William Ormston. It is a course that focuses on the cranial and cervical regions of the body of animal patients, detailing pathology that both is likely to present on first visit for animal patients and some which is highly unlikely to be seen very often. This course details for the animal chiropractor the cases which will respond to chiropractic, though considered by veterinarians as untreatable, and cases that will not respond to chiropractic. The student will complete this course with improved confidence in his or her ability to recognize issues in the skull and cervical spinal region that are chiropractic and those that will not respond appropriately to chiropractic. This will not make the student a diagnostician, however it will help him or her to avoid mistaking these situations for something else. This lecture will discuss radiographic findings in the sacropelvic region. While DCs will not be expected to diagnose radiographs in the animal patient, recognizing these findings is necessary in order to avoid taking referral cases from veterinarians who don’t recognize these issues.

     

    Cranial Cervical Pathology 2 is a course given by Dr. William Ormston. It is a course that focuses on the cranial and cervical regions of the body of animal patients, detailing pathology that both is likely to present on first visit for animal patients and some which is highly unlikely to be seen very often. This course details for the animal chiropractor the cases which will respond to chiropractic, though considered by veterinarians as untreatable, and cases that will not respond to chiropractic. The student will complete this course with improved confidence in his or her ability to recognize issues in the skull and cervical spinal region that are chiropractic and those that will not respond appropriately to chiropractic. This lecture will discuss radiographic findings in the sacropelvic region. While DCs will not be expected to diagnose radiographs in the animal patient, recognizing these findings is necessary in order to avoid taking referral cases from veterinarians who don’t recognize these issues.

     

    Thoracolumbar Pathology 1 is a course given by Dr. William Ormston in which he defines several illnesses or injuries that may present to the animal chiropractor on a daily basis. These cases are designed to show the animal chiropractor some of what they will be seeing and be able to recognize that they are or are not of a chiropractic nature. The student will have plenty of time to view these cases and understand how they may be musculoskeletal in nature, or may be somato-visceral in nature. This will help the student to determine whether or not the presenting complaint is chiropractic, or if it requires a referral to another doctor who can help the patient in another manner. This lecture will discuss radiographic findings in the sacropelvic region. While DCs will not be expected to diagnose radiographs in the animal patient, recognizing these findings is necessary in order to avoid taking referral cases from veterinarians who don’t recognize these issues.

     

    Thoracolumbar Pathology 2 is a course given by Dr. William Ormston in which he defines several illnesses or injuries that may present to the animal chiropractor on a daily basis. These cases are designed to show the animal chiropractor some of what they will be seeing and be able to recognize that they are or are not of a chiropractic nature. The student will have plenty of time to view these cases and understand how they may be musculoskeletal in nature, or may be somato-visceral in nature. This will help the student to determine whether or not the presenting complaint is chiropractic, or if it requires a referral to another doctor who can help the patient in another manner. This lecture will discuss radiographic findings in the sacropelvic region. While DCs will not be expected to diagnose radiographs in the animal patient, recognizing these findings is necessary in order to avoid taking referral cases from veterinarians who don’t recognize these issues.

     

    Systemic Pathology 1 is a course in which many of the terms described in Veterinary Lingo are explained in further detail, including many of the zoonotic diseases. The course proceeds further to consider some of the systemic diseases that may present as neuromusckular problems. This lecture prepares the animal chiropractic student for being able to diagnose areas of the nervous system that are affected by systemic dis-ease so that their chiropractic adjustments will become more effective.

     

    Systemic Pathology 2 is a course in which many of the terms described in Veterinary Lingo are explained in further detail, including many of the zoonotic diseases. The course proceeds further to consider some of the systemic diseases that may present as neuro-muscular problems. This lecture prepares the animal chiropractic student for being able to diagnose areas of the nervous system that are affected by systemic dis-ease so that their chiropractic adjustments will become more effective. This course differs from Systemic Pathology 1 in that it covers other areas of systemic dis-ease. This course broadens the student’s understanding of areas not covered in Systemic Pathology

     

    This course examines zoonotic and contagious dis-eases that may present to the animal chiropractor.

    Extremity Pathology 1 is a course in which students will have the opportunity to learn about both pathological conditions the animal chiropractor is presented on a daily basis and those pathological conditions students of animal chiropractic may find detailed on examinations. The scope of this course is limited to the extremities of the animal, particularly the thoracic limb. This course will prepare the student for passing the examination of the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association for certification in animal chiropractic as well as opening their eyes to the dis- ease associated with animal chiropractic.

     

    Extremity Pathology 2 is a course in which students will have the opportunity to learn about both pathological conditions the animal chiropractor is presented on a daily basis and those pathological conditions students of animal chiropractic may find detailed on examinations. The scope of this course is limited to the extremities of the animal, particularly the pelvic limb. This course will prepare the student for passing the examination of the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association for certification in animal chiropractic as well as opening their eyes to the dis- ease associated with animal chiropractic. This course differs from Extremity Pathology 1 in that it explores further the many issues

     

     

     

    Rehabilitation

     

    Animal Rehabilitation I is a course that covers the means by which to help an animal get optimal healing from the chiropractic adjustment. Just as treating a human for a sore throat is no help when they go back to breathing smoke all day, animals need help regaining their health outside of the office visit. This course will aid the student in recognizing when to address these needs and how to engage animal owners in participating in the health of their animals. The student will leave this course with an introductory understanding of rehabilitation methods.

     

    Animal Rehabilitation II is a course that covers the means by which to help an animal get optimal healing from the chiropractic adjustment. This intermediate course covers more territory on how to return injured and ill animals to their normal level of activity with the goal in mind to optimize their performance. In this course students learn increasing levels of physical care that can aid their patients in returning to functional lives. Students who complete this course will have an organized understanding of different levels of rehabilitation they can use to bring their patients along.

     

    Animal Rehabilitation III is a course that further develops the idea of using therapy to bring animal patients back to normal. In this lecture, Dr. Ormston introduces several techniques that require more equipment and that often appeal to animal owners who are interested in regaining athletic function for their animals. At the end of this lecture students will have been oriented to many of the more high tech options for aiding animals in making the most out of their chiropractic adjustment and regaining health.

     

    Neuromuscular Rehabilitation is a course that brings it all together. In this course the student will be reminded of what they know and how they will see it in the real world. Animals with damaged tissue have difficulty retaining information and moving through the world in a bilateral fashion. This causes increased cortical stress responses, decreasing metabolic rates, increasing systemic acidity. Attempts to gain motor function through exercise only perpetuate the disorder. Rehabilitation of the animal is more effective if we use the brain and spinal cord to help return the message to damaged tissues. In this lecture professionals will learn how to identify and use many of the neural tracts with the motor cortex to improve function and healing by incorporating several different stimulatory methods. At the end of this course students will be able to apply different rehabilitative modalities to their animal patients to achieve greater response to the chiropractic adjustment.

     

    Chiropractic History

     

    Chiropractic History by Dr. Bill Ormston explains much of what is known of chiropractic practices prior to its occurrence in the United States and its becoming a system through which doctors could heal patients. The goal of this lecture is to orient the student in the larger picture of chiropractic and how it evolved into what is currently practiced in the United States today.

     

    Chiropractic History by Dr. Neil Rabin delves a bit deeper into the life and times of D. D. Palmer, the founder of modern day chiropractic. In this lecture Dr. Rabin brings to our current time the issues with which D.D. Palmer was concerned over 150 years ago. The goal of this lecture is to make students aware that though chiropractic has had its infancy and growing pains as a profession, many of those same issues are still current topics today. At the completion of this course students will be able to understand what has driven chiropractic and how in many ways the issues of animal chiropractic are similar now.

     

    Chirorpactic History part 2 by Dr. Neil Rabin continues the history of the founding of chiropractic and explores how it became more wide spread through the teachings of both D.D. Palmer and B.J. Palmer. Dr. Rabin explores the history in such a way as to detail the rapid changes and modernization of chiropractic which has helped to bring it to the art and science it is today. The student will gain an appreciation for the modern day dilemmas found in chiropractic that owes its unease to the philosophy and duty it seeks to retain the belief that the body is capable of self-healing. The student will also gain a appreciation for what others have done for them to make their profession more stable and capable of achieving the goals it has set.

     

    Chirorpactic History part 3 by Dr. Neil Rabin continues the history of the founding of chiropractic and explores how it became more wide spread through the teachings of both D.D. Palmer and B.J. Palmer. Dr. Rabin continues the examination of the way in which the AMA continued to badger the chiropractic profession. In this lecture he describes the elements that lead up to the supreme court’s determination that the AMA had violated anti-trust laws. The student will also gain an appreciation for what others have done for them to make their profession more stable and capable of achieving the goals it has set.

     

    Chiropractic’s Fight for Licensure by Dr. Neil Rabin is a course that examines the historical damage the American Medical Association has done to the chiropractic profession. This course outlines the history of the fight between the AMA and American Chiropractors and details the resulting court cases in which the AMA was cited as violating the fair trade agreement. This course details the estimated 15,000 chiropractors who went to jail because of this fight. At the end of this course the student will be better able to understand the journey of chiropractic and chiropractors from founding to present.

     

    Dissent in Medicine is a course by Dr. Neil Rabin in which he examines the book by Robert Mendelsohn, M.D. In this course Dr. Rabin reviews and examines Mendelsohn’s confession that his patients were developing diseases that he himself had caused by treatment of their symptoms. He outlines hundreds of cases in which the prescriptions the doctors had been giving caused unresolvable harm to their patients, whereby the doctors essentially blamed the patients for not responding appropriately to the medication or treatment. One instance includes gynecologist/obstetricians who refused themselves to be vaccinated for rubella, which they prescribed to their patients. At the completion of this course students will be able to understand the dichotomy of medicine, the double standard by which M.D.s are taught to hold their patients and themselves in an effort to avoid accountability for the damage they have done.

     

    Chiropractic Philosophy

     

    The Philosophy of Chiropractic – The Science of Chiropractic is a lecture by Dr. Robert Leach in which he explores the questions of how to define chiropractic separately from the dogma that attempts to make it more like a fundamental religion and he makes it more like common sense scientific information. Dr. Leach explores his own and other research pathways that have led many to understand how and why chiropractic works. He distinguishes that chiropractic must have a sound philosophy on which to base its science, and science on which to base its practice. In doing this he helps the student realize that there are numerous studies in chiropractic in which animals have been used as models for humans, but where they can also serve as models for animal chiropractic practice. This is the first of a five part lecture.

     

    The Philosophy of Chiropractic – The Science of Chiropractic 2 is a lecture by Dr. Robert Leach. In this lecture Leach discusses the role of modern science and how it shapes a professional practice. In this lecture Leach also takes some time to explain how the media inform the public of their view of chiropractic and the fact that this view, while incorrect, shapes the majority of public viewpoints with regard to the profession. He makes a stand for chiropractors doing more clinical research and publishing more scientific research on their findings in a variety of journals in the hopes of changing the public view.

     

     

     

    The Philosophy of Chiropractic – The Science of Chiropractic 3 is a lecture by Dr. Robert Leach on how Modern Theory of Chiropractic Informs Practice. This lecture explains the need for chiropractic philosophy within a chiropractic practice in order to make the practice successful. Leach outlines the early theories on stress and its role in the subluxation complex, using several early researchers work to show how this is modeled and ways in which the non-inflammatory subluxation can be seen in daily life.

     

    The Philosophy of Chiropractic – The Science of Chiropractic 4 is a lecture by Dr. Robert Leach. In this lecture Dr. Leach outlines the physics of the spinal adjustment using research from both his own practice and that of several others, including Dr. Joel Pickar who has done several studies in using the cat as a model for the human spine. This of course is interesting to the animal chiropractor because it gives a direct example of the forces used by animal chiropractors on animal patients. Here he shows how the frequency of firing of the neurons are directly affected by the spinal adjustment in a positive way. He uses many other studies suggesting that clinical outcomes correlate well with the physical data that illustrates the function of the improvement in spinal movement.

     

    Chiropractic Philosophy is a course by Dr. Rabin where he defines for the student the basic language of chiropractic. He goes on to explain to the student that the chiropractic examination is more important than the actual adjustment as it determines not only where but if there are subluxations. This delightful lecture uses analogy and definition to explain the preciseness of chiropractic that distinguishes it from other forms of therapy.

     

    2 Veterinarians Philosophy is a course in which both Dr. Ormston and Dr. Hayek express their veterinary and chiropractic philosophy practices and how it has shaped their work and their lives. The course covers some of the competing philosophies of other medical professions and some of the Parker principles of chiropractic. Essentially this course illustrates how our practice moves our life and orders our world. The goal of this lecture is to allow animal chiropractic students to see that in moving into new ideas that they hold dearly, it is up to them to make changes. The clients won’t make changes for them, and some won’t make changes at all. Students will be able to determine for themselves how they intend to move forward with their own animal practices, at what pace, and in what fashion.

     

    Practice Management

     

    Animal Chiropractic Applied with Dr. Amy is a lecture that includes some historical aspects of veterinary medicine. This lecture follows the practice of veterinary medicine and chiropractic through time and philosophy to explain how they are compatible in today’s practice management. This course aids both professionals in understanding the nuances of animal chiropractic, which takes some from both professions and results in a clearly new profession that is distinct from either of the two. The student will complete this course and be able to draw an understanding of how each profession adds value to animal chiropractic.

     

    Case Studies 1 – 7A lectures are a series of lectures that are designed to allow the student to appreciate animal chiropractic in a real live practice. Each case study lecture is oriented around the anatomical portion of the animal that is being discussed during each session. Thus case studies will be explored that examine pathology in the sacropelvic region during the first lecture session, the cranial and cervical regions during the second lecture session, etc. Cases are real actual patients, with real outcomes. Not all of these cases had completely successful outcomes. Any real practice occasionally has failures, both of treatment and in communication. These are excellent learning opportunities for doctors, and students. The student will be able to understand how cases for different anatomical

     

     

     

     

     

    regions may present, and will gain confidence in knowing that not every case is perfect, but that she or he will be prepared to address the patients that arrive at his or her door.

     

    Case Management is a course by Dr. Bill Ormston. In this lecture Dr. Ormston offers the students the encouragement to market their practices. He also outlines a way in which to organize office visits for patients and gives students a means by which to organize their thinking process when addressing issues brought to them. At the completion of this class students will be able to address patients in an organized manner in which they can systematically attend to client complaints.

     

    Introduction to Saddle Fit is a course that looks at 6 ingredients of saddle fit. Anatomy, Gravity, Horse, Saddle, Rider and Movement are all examined and their importance in deciding the quality of the saddle’s function.

     

    Objective Saddle Fit is a course that shows the student how to objectively measure the fit of a saddle. All of the issues from the introduction lecture are covered. It takes a subject that has traditionally been an objective issue and allows the chiropractor to use hard facts to see if and when a saddle will work with a given horse and rider.

     

    What’s My Job: Equine is a course by Dr. Bill Ormston. In this animated lecture Dr. Ormston describes various activities in which horses are asked to perform a job or event. During this description he highlights the stresses and movements required in each discipline with its relationship to Animal Chiropractic. This allows the students to see how they can often focus their work on an animal based on what is required of the animal in its job. Students who complete this course will have the ability to determine what activity may likely produce certain subluxations, and will be able to correct those subluxations.

     

    What’s My Job: Canine is a course by Dr Bill Ormston. In this animated lecture Dr. Ormston describes various activities in which canines are asked to perform a job or event. During this description he highlights the stresses and movements required in each discipline with its relationship to Animal Chiropractic. This allows the students to see how they can often focus their work on an animal based on what is required of the animal in its job. Students who complete this course will have the ability to determine what activity may likely produce certain subluxations, and will be able to correct those subluxations.

     

    Gait Analysis

     

    Gait Analysis parts 1 through 6 are individual courses taught by Dr. Ormston that progressively take the student from seeing the biomechanics as a complex system of motion to seeing the individual elements of gait that make it possible to be able to access animals in motion. Dr. O explains that being able to identify the organization of biomechanics of movement in animals are important for the animal chiropractor to be able to diagnose and successfully treat the patient. Since normal movement of the animal is what we strive for as animal chiropractors, understanding step by step the process of identifying what we see in normal animal movement and what constitutes abnormal animal movement is essential. Evaluating the animal moving is far more important than examining the animal at rest in this discipline. Gait analysis allows the animal chiropractor to begin to understand the means by which gravity interacts with various species, various disciplines of athletics, and different jobs of animal patients. This allows the animal chiropractor to become more effective at communicating with clients about their animals.

     

    Measuring Gait 1, 2 and 3 are individual courses taught by Dr. Ormston that identify and describe the importance of posture and how it relates to the brain’s ability to respond to gravity. These courses go on to identify the difference between subjective and objective gait analysis and how they can be beneficial and detrimental to diagnosis of the movement issues which translate into changes in the neurological system. It is the neurological system that we correct in chiropractic adjustment. This course gives the student a clear system by which to access patients.

     

    Laboratory Sessions

     

    Sacro – Pelvic Canine Technique lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the sacro-pelvic and tail regions of the dog. The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the canine patient. They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction. The students will observe pictures as well as perform the techniques on stuffed canine replicas.

     

    Control of the Canine Laboratory will be done with live canine patients. Students must be able to demonstrate proper restraint techniques. Control is an integral part of the handling of animals and is critical to safety of the handler and the animal chiropractic practitioner. Students will be able to demonstrate the proper techniques to lift a dog onto a table, to muzzle a dog with a commercial muzzle, leash or gauze and to be able to hold the dog’s face by the cheeks or manually restrain a dog’s muzzle. They will be able to show the proper technique to place and hold a dog in both lateral and sternal recumbency.

     

    Canine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the Sacro – pelvic region will be done with live canine patients. Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor. In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (Tuber Sacrale (PSIS), Tuber Coxae (ASIS), Wing of the Ilium, Sacral Apex, etc), articulations (Coxofemoral Joint, Sacroiliac Joint, Lumbosacral Joint), ligaments (Sacrotuberous ligament, Supra spinous ligament, etc) and muscles (Gluteus superficialis, Longissimus dorsi, etc)

     

    Canine Sacropelvic Technique Laboratory will be done with live canine patients. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live dog. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the dog, the handler and themselves. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the pelvis and tail.

     

    Canine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the sacro-pelvic area will be done on live canine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available. The joints of the pelvis and tail will be examined from a motion analysis point of view. The process of determining leg length in the canine patient will be examined.

     

    Canine Technique Review Laboratory on the sacropelvic region will be done with articulated skeletal models. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the model. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the pelvis and tail.

     

    Ossesous Anatomy Laboratory of the sacrolpelvic region will include the use of numerous species of skeletal models. Students will identify landmarks on the bones. These include protuberences, joint surfaces and muscle attachment. Form and function will be discussed as the students compare the bones and joint angles of the different species.

     

    Speeder Board Laboratory will help the student learn the meaning of the equation f=ma as it applies to animal chiropractic work. Developing speed and proper technique is important. Joints involved in the thrust must be locked out. Back and body position must be correct. Stabilization must be provided as the thrust is applied. Contact points utilized in animal chiropractic may differ from those in the human profession and will include the guarded thumb, pisiform contact, thenar contact, hypothenar contact, web or metacarpophalangeal joint contact and the finger pull.

     

    Sacro – Pelvic Equine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the sacro-pelvic and tail regions of the horse. The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the equine patient. They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction. The students will observe pictures of the setups on the live horse as well as on a skeleton of a horse.

     

    Control of Horse Laboratory will be done with live equine patients. Students must be able to demonstrate proper restraint techniques. Control is an integral part of the handling of animals and is critical to safety of the handler and the animal chiropractic practitioner. Students should be able to demonstrate how to enter a horse’s stall and place a halter on it, how to hold the lead rope correctly when holding a horse and how to tie a horse up using a quick release knot. They should be able to pick up and clean a hoof with a hoof pick, apply a nose twitch, an under the lip twine and a stud chain correctly and safely. The student will be able to walk, trot and back a horse.

     

    Equine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the Sacro – pelvic region will be done with live equine patients. Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor. In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (Tuber Sacrale (PSIS), Tuber Coxae (ASIS), Wing of the Ilium, Sacral Apex, etc), articulations (Coxofemoral Joint, Sacroiliac Joint, Lumbosacral Joint), ligaments (Sacrotuberous ligament, Supra spinous ligament, etc) and muscles (Gluteus superficialis, Longissimus dorsi, etc).

     

    Equine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the sacropelvic area will be done on live equine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available. The joints of the pelvis and tail will be examined from a motion analysis point of view. The process of determining leg length in the equine patient will be examined.

     

    Equine Sacropelvic Technique Laboratory will be done with live equine patients. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live horse. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the horse, the handler and themselves. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were horse owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the pelvis and tail.

     

    Report of Findings, “Show Me” Chiropractic Lecture will discuss the topics that should be included in an animal chiropractic report of findings including but not limited to chiropractor’s credentials, innate and how the animal might respond to the adjustment. Rehab and post adjustment protocols will be discussed as well as ways that the owner can tell if the adjustment helped the animal.

     

    Cranial Cervical Canine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the cranial and cervical regions of the dog. The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the canine patient. They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction. The students will observe pictures as well as perform the techniques on stuffed canine replicas.

     

     

     

    Canine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the cranial cervical region will be done with live canine patients. Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor. In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (mandible, occiput, C1 thru C7), articulations (temporomandibular joint, alanto-occipital joint, intervertebral joints of C1 thru C7, cervical zygapophyseal joints), ligaments (supra spinous ligament, ligamentum flavum), and muscles (masseter , brachiocephalicus, orbicularis oris ).

     

    Canine Cranial Cervical Technique Laboratory will be done with live canine patients. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live dog. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the dog, the handler and themselves. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the head and neck.

     

    Canine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the cranial cervical area will be done on live canine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available. The joints of the head and neck will be examined from a motion analysis point of view. The process of determining leg length in the canine patient will be examined.

     

    Canine Technique Review Laboratory on the cranial cervical region will be done with articulated skeletal models. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the model. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the head and neck.

     

    Ossesous Anatomy Laboratory of the cranial cervical region will include the use of numerous species of skeletal models. Students will identify landmarks on the bones. These include protuberences, joint surfaces and muscle attachment. Form and function will be discussed as the students compare the bones and joint angles of the different species.

     

    Canine Neurological Examination Laboratory will be performed on live canine patients. Chiropractic is neurology. As the students make the clients more aware of movement owners may become more aware of their dog’s activities. It is important to show and explain problems that you see prior to the first adjustment. The animal chiropractor must never assume that another doctor has examined the patient and noted all of the neurological problems prior to the adjustment. The examination must include observation of mental status, posture, gait, and musculoskeletal symmetry or lack of. Cranial nerves, spinal nerves and postural reflexes will be examined by the student.

     

    Cranial Cervical Equine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the cranial and cervical regions of the horse. The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the equine patient. They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction. The students will observe pictures of the set ups on live animals as well as on the skeleton of a horse.

     

    Equine Neurological Examination Laboratory will be performed on live equine patients. Chiropractic is neurology. As the students make the clients more aware of movement owners may become more aware of their horse’s activities. It is important to show and explain problems that you see prior to the first adjustment. The animal chiropractor must never assume that another doctor has examined the patient and noted all of the neurological problems prior to the adjustment. The examination must include observation of mental status, posture, gait, and musculoskeletal symmetry or lack of. Cranial nerves, spinal nerves and postural reflexes will be examined by the student.

     

    Equine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the cranial and cervical regions will be done with live equine patients. Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor. In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (mandible, occiput, C1 thru C7), articulations (temporomandibular joint, alanto-occipital joint, intervertebral joints of C1 thru C7, cervical zygapophyseal joints), ligaments (supra spinous ligament, ligamentum flavum), and muscles (masseter , brachiocephalicus, orbicularis oris ).

     

    Equine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the cranial and cervical areas will be done on live equine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available. The joints of the head and neck will be examined from a motion analysis point of view. The process of determining leg length in the equine patient will be examined.

     

    Equine Cranial and Cervical Technique Laboratory will be done with live equine patients. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live horse. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the horse, the handler and themselves. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were horse owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the head and neck.

     

    Equine Gait Analysis Laboratory will be done utilizing live equine patients. The student will watch horse walk – right to left, left to right, away, towards and watch horse trot – right to left, left to right, away, towards as they attempt to identify problems. They will use available tools to analyze gait. These include but are not limited to footprints in the sand, walk beside and or watch someone else walk beside the horse, listen to the foot beats, change the center of gravity and surface.

     

    Canine gait analysis laboratory will be done utilizing live canine patients. The student will watch dog walk – right to left, left to right, away, towards and watch dog trot – right to left, left to right, away, towards as they attempt to identify problems. They will use available tools to analyze gait. These include but are not limited to paw prints in the sand, walk beside and or watch someone else walk beside the dog, listen to the foot beats, change the center of gravity and surface.

     

    Implementing Animal Chiropractic Lecture discusses ways to begin an animal chiropractic practice. Topics include the legalities of practice and some of the paperwork required in animal medical records and hippa. The instructors discuss advertising and forms that they use and some that others use.

     

    Thoracolumbar Canine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the thorax and lumbar regions of the dog. The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the canine patient. They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction. The students will observe pictures as well as perform the techniques on stuffed canine replicas.

     

     

     

    Canine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the thoracolumbar region will be done with live canine patients. Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor. In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (spinous process of thoracic vertebrae, transverse process of lumbar vertebrae, sternum), articulations (intervertebral joints, costovertebral joints), ligaments (supra spinous ligament, ligamentum flavum), and muscles (rhomboideus, triceps brachii, longus colli, transverses abdominis, psoas major).

     

    Canine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the thoracolumbar area will be done on live canine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available. The joints of the thorax and lumbar region will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.

     

    Canine Technique Review Laboratory on the thoracolumbar region will be done with articulated skeletal models. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the model. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the thorax and lumbar region.

     

    Canine Thoracolumbar Technique Laboratory will be done with live canine patients. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live dog. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the dog, the handler and themselves. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the thorax and lumbar region.

     

    Ossesous Anatomy Laboratory of the thoracolumbar region will include the use of numerous species of skeletal models. Students will identify landmarks on the bones. These include protuberences, joint surfaces and muscle attachment. Form and function will be discussed as the students compare the bones and joint angles of the different species.

     

    Thoracolumbar Equine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the thorax and lumbar region of the horse. The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the equine patient. They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction. The students will observe pictures of the set ups on live animals as well as on the skeleton of a horse.

     

    The purpose of the Equine Saddle Fit Lab is to allow students to be able to discuss saddle fit with confidence to the client. They should be able to identify symmetry of saddle vs. horse. They should be able to check for tree health, protuberences and other defects that would make the saddle unsafe for horse and rider. Parts of the basic Western and English saddle will be identified. Discussion will identify ways to determine if a saddle fits the horse. The student will be able to place a saddle on a live horse.

     

    Equine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the thorax and lumbar areas will be done on live equine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available. The joints of the thorax and lumbar area will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.

     

    Equine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the thoracolumbar region will be done with live equine patients. Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor. In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (spinous process of thoracic vertebrae, transverse process of lumbar vertebrae, sternum), articulations (intervertebral joints, costovertebral joints), ligaments (supra spinous ligament, ligamentum flavum), and muscles (rhomboideus, triceps brachii, longus colli, transverses abdominis, psoas major).

     

    Equine Thoracolumbar Technique Laboratory will be done with live equine patients. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live horse. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the horse, the handler and themselves. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were horse owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the thorax and lumbar region.

     

    Extremity Canine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the thorax and lumbar regions of the dog. The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the canine patient. They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction. The students will observe pictures as well as perform the techniques on stuffed canine replicas.

     

    Canine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the extremities will be done with live canine patients. Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor. In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, femur), articulations (carpal joint, stifle joint, hock joint), ligaments (patellar tendon, calcaneal tendon) and muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, common digital extensor, gluteals -Superficial, Medial, and Deep)

     

    Canine Extremity Technique Laboratory will be done with live canine patients. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live dog. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the dog, the handler and themselves. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were dog owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of both the front and back legs.

     

    Canine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the extremities will be done on live canine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available. The joints of the both front and back legs will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.

     

    Ossesous Anatomy Laboratory of the extremities will include the use of numerous species of skeletal models. Students will identify landmarks on the bones. These include protuberences, joint surfaces and muscle attachment. Form and function will be discussed as the students compare the bones and joint angles of the different species.

     

    Extremity Equine Technique Lecture will cover some common chiropractic listings in the front and back legs of the horse. The student will learn proper safety and body position to enable them to adjust common subluxations in the equine patient. They will learn how to choose a contact point that enables adequate control of the segmental contact point to insure restoration of movement when the thrust is applied in the correct line of correction. The students will observe pictures of the set ups on live animals as well as on the skeleton of a horse.

     

    Equine Gross Anatomy Laboratory on the extremities will be done with live equine patients. Students should be able to locate with confidence anatomical landmarks and tell of their significance to the animal chiropractor. In this region these landmarks include but are not limited to osseous structures (scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, femur), articulations (carpal joint, stifle joint, hock joint), ligaments (patellar tendon, calcaneal tendon) and muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, common digital extensor, gluteals -Superficial, Medial, and Deep)

     

    Equine Extremity Technique Laboratory will be done with live equine patients. Students should be able to demonstrate chiropractic set ups appropriate for the region on the live horse. Students should use appropriate safety measures to protect the horse, the handler and themselves. Student must demonstrate proper stabilization, contact point, segmental contact point and line of correction. They will practice talking to the other students and instructor as they would if these people were horse owner’s and untrained technicians. There will be a discussion of the clinical signs associated with the listings. The areas involved in this lab will include the joints of the front and back leg. Students may opt out of the rear leg if they are uncomfortable.

     

    Equine Motion Palpation Laboratory over the legs will be done on live equine patients. Palpation skills are important in the diagnosis of the chiropractic subluxation. Palpation should be very light, normal joints will be examined as will subluxated and fixated joints if they are available. The joints of the both front and back legs will be examined from a motion analysis point of view.

     

    The onsite Case Study Lecture will focus on cases that the students have examined during their course of study at home. These may be their own animals, or animals belonging to clients. They will present the case and discuss the outcomes. PowerPoint and video presentations are encouraged but not required. They may use the online case study lectures as examples.

     

    Getting started with Video Gait Analysis – This course introduces the students to the terminology of video. It explains the important things needed in collecting a quality video that can be used to analyze gait. Types of cameras, cabling, and storage methods are examined.

     

    Video Gait Analysis 101 – A step by step instruction on the use of the Sportsmotion Gait Analysis program to measure an animal’s gait. The student is shown how to use the tools on each of the four tool bars to move around in a video clip.

     

    Video Gait Analysis 201 (C or E) – A step by step instruction on how to use the Sportsmotion Gait Analysis program to measure changes in an animal’s gait. The student is taken step by step through the process of measuring thoracic angles, pelvic angles, break over angles, etc. of the chosen species. Video clips of multiple animals are included to help the student retain what they have discussed.

     

    REFERENCE TEXTS

     

    REFERENCE TEXTS 

     

    These references are presented to assist individuals in preparing for the Written Comprehensive and Clinical (Practical) Competency Examinations and are used in the development of both examinations. Study of these references will not guarantee that an individual will pass the ACCC certification examinations. Moreover, this list is not comprehensive and does not imply that references that are not on this list are inappropriate or of lesser value or quality than references that are included.  The staff at A.C.E.S. has made every effort to include the necessary information out of these texts in their presentations.  This makes the purchase of these books unnecessary unless the student desires to add to their library.

     

    1.Animal Chiropractic Care: Willoughby, DVM, DC (Revised Edition, 2001), published by Graphic Concepts, DVM, Hillsdale, IL, Can be ordered directly from Graphic Concepts: 309-658-2144, fax 309-658-2157

     

    2.Palpation Skills, Assessment and Diagnosis Through Touch: L. Chaitow, Churchill, Livingstone, (2000), ISBN: 0-443-05320-0

     

    3.Guide to Equine Clinics #2: Pasquini, Jann & Pasquini, Sudz Publishing, Pilot Point, TX,940-686-9208, OCLC:39260737

     

    4.Understanding the Horse’s Back: S. Wyche (2001), Crowood Press, Marlborough, ISBN: 1861261144

     

    5.The Chiropractic Theories, 4th Edition: Leach (2003), Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, ISBN:0683049046

     

    6.Tschauners Guide to Small Animals: Pasquini & Pasquini, Sudz Publishing, Pilot Point, TX,940-686-9208, OCLC: 34744155

     

    7.Illustrated Atlas of Clinical Equine Anatomy and Common Disorders of the Horse:Vol. One: R.J. Riegel, S. E. Hakola (1997) Equistar Publications, 800-440-8064 or http://www.equistarpub.com/

     

    8.Clinical Biomechanics of Spinal Manipulation:W. Herzog (2000). Churchill Livingstone, ISBN: 0-443-07808-4

     

    9.Essential Principles of Chiropractic: V.V. Strang (1984), Palmer College of Chiropractic, Davenport, Iowa

     

    10.The Horse’s Pain-Free Back and Saddle-Fit Book: Joyce Harman, DVM, MRCVS (2004), ISBN: 1-57076-292- 9, Trafalgar Square Publishing

     

    11.Zoonosis Updatesfrom the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Second Edition: (1995), American Veterinary Medical Association or www.avma.org/reference/zoonosis/default.asp